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February currency update

Considering the global stock market turmoil of late and the wild swings in the oil price over the last 5 days, you have to say that the European single currency has managed to avoid any major calamity and has continued to trade within a reasonably tight range against the US$; with Read more ».08 – 1.10 give or take a few pips containing the price action.

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December Currency update

This week was always only ever going to be about the US Federal Reserve’s interest rate decision and subsequent statement which had been so long anticipated. Read more »

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October currency update

The euro started the week with a slight advantage over the weakened US dollar following the previous Friday’s disappointing non-farm payrolls release which saw 142,000 jobs created during September versus an expectation of 200,000 plus. With downwards revisions to earlier month’s data, it was clear the US dollar would not have it all its own way, although the euro too was not going to be in for a smooth ride over the week.

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September currency update

The Euro managed to stage a small recovery over the last five days in spite of the previous weeks reaffirmation from European Central bank Governor Mario Draghi that the Eurozone’s current woes did warrant further negative revisions to the regions GDP (Gross Domestic Product) forecasts. His willingness to yet again state his unwavering commitment to do whatever it takes to restore economic prosperity was interpreted as more QE (quantitative easing) measures being available.

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August’s currency update

Things in Euroland have moved on a long way from the precarious situation in early July.  Greece’s government has apologised to Brussels for messing around, the parliament in Athens has approved reform measures unthinkable a couple of months ago and a new bailout has been agreed, all bar the dotting of a few Is and the crossing of some remaining Ts.

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Worried about the French CGT? 2015 update

When buying a property in France, it’s important to keep in mind that the value of the property is likely to increase with time, resulting in a capital gain. A Capital Gains Tax (CGT), known in French as an ‘impôt sur les plus values’ is only applicable on the increase.

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June’s currency update

Since the euro’s rebound in mid-March it has been looking reasonably chipper.  In April it was in the leading group of major currencies, strengthening by five eighths of a cent against sterling and the Australian dollar and taking four and a quarter cents off the back marker, the US dollar.

Read more »

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Overview of capital gains tax for non-residents in France

Since reforms taken by the French government in 2012 in regards to capital gains tax, France has been seen by international property investors as being not tax friendly in comparison with the UK. Read more »

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May’s currency update

Since the euro’s rebound in mid-March it has been looking reasonably chipper. In April it was in the leading group of major currencies, strengthening by five eighths of a cent against sterling and the Australian dollar and taking four and a quarter cents off the back marker, the US dollar.

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Non-residents can claim a refund of French social charges

Since 2012, many non-French residents selling or letting their French properties had to pay French social charges (15.5%) in addition to their capital gains or income taxes. This tax addition was highly criticised by the non-French residents as being discriminatory. A risk of double taxation was created on tax payers residing in a EU Member State. Read more »